Sermons tagged with ‘Jesus’

110 of 67 items

The Widow and the Unjust Judge

What we really have here is a parable about a persistent and vindictive widow who was willing to do whatever it took to get her way … and an unjust narcissistic judge who changed a legal ruling for fear of his own safety. The parables aren’t as straight forward and clean as we want them to be, and for good reason, to challenge us to greater faithfulness.

The Laborers in the Vineyard

The Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard isn’t about the laborers, and it’s not about the vineyard. Jesus says it’s about the landowner. To understand the Kingdom as Jesus describes it, we must re-hear the text as a provocative call to radical justice that cares more about the well-being of the community than about any one person’s claim to wealth.

The Mustard Seed

The Parable of the Mustard Seed does say that great outcomes arrive from small beginnings, but such a reading is banal. It’s simple. It’s too easy. It’s not provocative enough. What was Jesus really saying? Take another read.

The Pearl of Great Price

The parables weren’t offered to make us feel good about our discipleship. They are intentionally provoking, and challenge us to a greater faithfulness. The Pearl of Great Price should not be understood as a self-centered congratulatory allegory, but a hard challenge to deeper discipleship.

The Good Samaritan

When you hear the story from the ears of the Jews to whom Jesus was speaking, you begin to realize the Samaritan wasn’t seen to be such a “Good” guy. In fact, Jesus using the Samaritan as the faithful one was offensive at best. This kind of radical love is missed when we assume the Samaritan was just a kind passer-by.

The Sheep, The Coin, The Son

Editorial additions to the Biblical text, like section headers, often impact our ability to faithfully hear Jesus’ words. To understand the parables, like that of the lost sheep, coin, and son, we have to strip away 2000 years of explanatory interpretations to rehear Jesus’ words with the ears of the Pharisees.

Getting Theological: Ascension

The power of God is not offered for our tribe, our kingdom, or our gain. Christ’s ascension is just another necessary action of God in critique of the self-motivation of disciples. Christ once more calls us to be prepared for the Spirit to lead us in dispersing power as we share God’s love with all persons, even to the ends of the earth.

Tabitha’s Resurgence

Tabitha’s resurgent life is no more for herself that Peter’s resurgent faith is for himself. Peter’s gift of faith brings about new life in Tabitha, which in turn brings about new life and new faith in the community.

Resurgence: Peter

In the midst of our worst seasons of life, we will find a resurgence of life when we slow down and gather with one another in the presence of the Risen Christ. Slow down, and share some grilled salmon by the fire pit.

Thomas’ Resurgence

We want concrete realities, and for those whom it benefits, we desire to maintain the status quo … we want to proclaim our truth without being told we are wrong. But in the resurrection, we are offered a new truth, a new promise – that life wins out over death.